Wobbly Cart Farm Fall CSA week 3

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11-3-15

Large shares: delicata squash, leeks, kale, turnips, carrots, radicchio, purple potatoes, garlic, thyme

Small shares: delicata squash, leeks, kale, radicchio, red fingerling potatoes, broccoli or extra red fingerling potatoes, garlic, thyme

Dear CSA members,

The final weekend of October finally brought us some serious fall weather here in our river valley. The storm brought close to 5 inches of rain over three days and wind gusts up to 30 mph! Our beautiful Chehalis River went from low-looking, to almost bank-full within 24 hours. She is now a muddy beast rolling and foaming along at great speed with logs and debris along for the ride as well.

This time of year we will begin to keep an eye on the hydrograph projections to watch what the river will be doing in regards to flooding, so we can plan ahead if and when crops and equipment need to be moved to higher ground. This is simply a fact of life in a river flood plain. While inconvenient at times, I do appreciate the powerful force of our river and the need to keep a respectful and watchful eye on her. Otherwise, we may find ourselves in grief over lost equipment and crops that could have been saved. In return, the flood waters will bring us a fresh supply of nutrients and topsoil when they do come. The river is what built the soil we farm on after all!

Our fields didn’t flood this time, but we certainly are getting used to being back in muddy conditions (something we havent had a whole lot of this season). Heavy wet rain gear and mud laden boots weigh us down, boxes are slippery, and trucks must be parked strategically so as not to get stuck when heavily loaded with produce. Not to mention the fact that washing the bunches is extra difficult when there is so much mud stuck to them.

November brings with it stormy weather, but also a nice reduction in work load. We are officially down to just two market days per week (Saturday and Sunday at the Olympia Farmers market). Additionally, after this week, there will be just one remaining CSA delivery! Setting the clocks back this last Sunday gives us an extra hour of sleep, and as it is dark so early, we are forced to come in for the day by 6pm. More dark hours means more rest, and more rest means happier farmers. We will also have more time to plan for next season and catch up on paper work. Whoo hoo!

Delicata squash: is the queen of the winter squash in my opinion. They are a nice size, easy to cut and clean, have a thin, edible skin and excellent flavor. Delicata is excellent roasted, caramelized, made into soups or baked into a pie! Most people think they are even sweeter and creamier than butternut squash. This squash will also keep for a several weeks in a cool dry place or just out on the countertop to be admired.

Purple potatoes: these beautiful tubers originate from heirloom varieties that have been cultivated for thousands of years in the Andes mountains of South America. Purple potatoes are beautiful in color and very high in an anti-oxidant called anthocyanin that is a known cancer fighting substance. Their flavor is slightly mealy and dry compared to a yellow finn or a fingerling but they are nonetheless excellent roasted, fried or used in soups and stews.

Radicchio: this hardy winter green is in the chicory family, it has a bitter taste that mellows with the onset of cold weather and also when you grill or roast it. Raddichio is an excellent addition to salads particularly when paired with cheese, fruits and toasted nuts.

Leeks: Leeks are a member of the allium family of onions, garlic, scallions etc. They are milder, sweeter, and more delicate in flavor than onions are are often used in soups and broths. To clean, cut the leek in half vertically, and fan out the sheaves under running water to get out any dirt that may be hiding there. The white part is the desirable portion, as the green leaves tend to be tougher and stronger flavored. You can store leeks in the crisper of the refrigerator for several weeks if they are left untrimmed.

Thyme: is an herb from a low growing woody perennial plant. This aromatic herb can be used for cooking, medicine, and aromatic purposes and stands up very well to our robust fall and winter vegetables. The leaves are excellent fresh added to your dishes near the end of cooking to preserve the delicate flavor. Also, you could easily dry your thyme for later use by spreading the sprigs out in a warm dry location for a few days, then stripping the dry leaves off into a storage container.

Enjoy and have a great week,

Asha, Joe and the crew at Wobbly Cart

Grilled Chicory: heat grill to high heat. Slice your chicory vertically, and discard any bruised leaves. Brush the greens with olive oil and balsamic vinegar and sprinkle with good sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Turn grill down to med-low. Place the greens on the grill and cook turning every 1 to 2 minutes until the leaves turn a rich crusty brown on both sides. 5 to 10 minutes. Cut the greens into 4 to 6 servings and serve warm or at room temperature with additional vinaigrette.

Radicchio salad with goat cheese and hazelnuts: In a large bowl whisk together ¼ cup olive oil, 3 tbsp red wine vinegar, 1 ½ tsp sugar and season with salt and pepper. Tear up about 1 pound radicchio into bite sized pieces, add 1/3 cup blanched and toasted hazelnuts (almond and walnuts would work too) chopped. Serve salad topped with 1-cup goat cheese.

Potato Leek Soup: Melt 3 tbsp butter in a soup pot over low heat. Add and cook, stirring, until tender but not browned about 20 minutes 2 large leeks, chopped. Stir in 1 1/4 lbs peeled and thinnly sliced yellow finn potatoes. Add 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, simmer until the potatoes are soft about 30 minutes. Puree until smooth. Season with salt, pepper, and fresh thyme to taste.

Fall Potato Salad: Toss 2 lbs cubed potatoes with salt and olive oil and spread on a baking sheet. Roast in a 450 degree oven for 20 to 30 minutes. Combine with various fall vegetables of your choice; onion, shallot, garlic, carrots, roasted winter squash,celariac or parsnips for example. Toss with fresh tomato wedges, basil, thyme or other herbs of your choice. Dress with ¼ cup olive oil whipped with 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar.

Leek and Potato Gratin: Preheat oven to 375. In a large pot of salted boiling water, parboil 3 lbs red potatoes, sliced 1/8 inch thick, for 5 minutes. Drain potatoes well and set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp unsalted butter over medium heat. Saute 10 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1 inch pieces (washed thoroughly), and 4 chopped garlic cloves until leeks are tender about 7 minutes. Set aside. In a buttered 9 x 13 inch baking dish, arrange half of reserved potatoes in an overlapping pattern. Pour 1 cup cream and ½ cup milk over the top and sprinkle with 1 tsp salt. Top with reserved leeks and arrange remaining potatoes. Pour another cup of heavy cream and ½ cup milk and sprinkle with ½ tsp salt. Bake until potatoes are tender, top of gratin is golden brown, and most of the cream and milk have been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Garnish with parsely. Serves 12. From November 2011 issue of Country Living magazine).

Frizzled Leeks: Cut 2 leeks (white and very light green parts only) into 2 inch lengths and then cut lengthwise into very fine shreds. Rinse the shreds thoroughly, using your fingers to separate the pieces and remove any grit hiding there. Drain thoroughly and blot dry with a clean towel. While the leeks dry, heat 2 to 4 cups canola oil in a deep pan. The pan should hold about 1 ½ inches deep of the oil. When the oil surface is shivering, add a few leek shreds and fry for 10 to 15 seconds. Remove the leeks to a paper towel lined platter to drain and cool. The oil should be hot enough to crisp the leeks golden brown in about 10 to 15 seconds, adjust temperature as needed. Fry the leeks in small batches until all are golden and crisp. Lightly season them with salt and use for snacking or to top salads and creamy soups. They will keep in an airtight container for 3 days at room temp.

 Baked delicata squash with brown sugar and butter: Preheat oven to 400. Cut 1 delicata squash in half and scoop out seeds. Mix together 2 tbsp brown sugar, 2 tbsp softened butter, 2 tbsp maple syrup, and salt and pepper to taste. Rub the inside of the squash with this mixture. Place the squash cut side up on a baking sheet and bake the squash for about 1 hour or until tender when pierced with a fork.

Wobbly Cart Farm fall CSA box #1

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10-21-14

Wobbly Cart Farm Fall CSA box #1

Large share: Acorn squash, leeks, fingerling potatoes, celeriac, vitamin green, carrots, butterhead lettuce, cherry tomatoes, shallots, thyme

 Small: Acorn squash, leeks, carrot, vitamin green, celeriac, mixed potatoes, cherry tomatoes, thyme

 

Dear CSA members,

 

Welcome to the first box of the fall season! We are so happy you have joined us/ continued on from the summer season with us. We have so much delicious produce available in our pacific-northwest fall/winter and it’s exciting to be able to share it with you!

When we first started Wobbly Cart Farm 10 years ago we were for the most part done with our season by mid November. Winter was a time of rest and recuperation. These days, through planning, infrastructure, and having a market for the produce we now continue on virtually year round. Most of our fall and winter crops get deeded and transplanted in the month of August, which gives them ample growing time before the short wet days of late October come along. The moisture and lack of light dosen’t allow for much growth past late September, so we must get the crops in early to size up before that time. We also have 2 high tunnels (greenhouses where we grow in the ground) that have further extended our season and crop options. We also have a lot of produce such as winter squash, potatoes, and onions in storage that we rely on for the weeks to come.

What you see in your box this week is a great example of the crops that we do have available this time of year!

 Acorn squash: this winter squash is a very familiar one to most of us. Acorn squash has a sweet, nutty flavor and is excellent baked, sautéed, or steamed. Acorn squash is also delicious made into soups. The seeds can be cleaned and roasted and make a tasty and nutritious snack. This squash will keep for quite some time in a cool dry place.

Leeks: this long and lovely member of the Allium family (onions, garlic and the like) is one of our star winter performers. They will stay alive through most winters here as long as the temperature dosen’t go below 10 degrees or so. They are much prized by chefs for their mild and tender flavor. To use them, first slice the whole thing vertically. Then fan out the many layers under running water to remove any trapped sediments. Slice off the tougher deep green tops, and use the white and light green parts in your recipes. Leeks will also keep for many weeks in your fridge crisper drawer. By peeling away outer layers, you can remove any discolored parts if you do decide to keep them for an extended time.

 Vitamin green: this asian green is similar to bok choy but more delicate in texture. I noticed that this batch is extra tender and likely to get slightly bruised. I would attribute this to the warm growing conditons we have been having this October. That said, you should probably use these up very soon! Vitamin green is also very sweet and delicious so that shouldn’t be a problem. They are great sautéed, or eaten fresh.

 Celariac: the large and unusual knobby root with celery-like tops is celeriac. When the root is scrubbed and peeled, inside is a firm ivory flesh. The celeriac roots is very low in starch and is a nice alternative to potatoes and other starchier root vegetables. It tastes like a subtle blend of celery and parsley. You can use it in soups, grated into salads, roasted in a pan of other root vegetables, or even French fried instead of potatoes.

Thyme: is an herb from a low growing woody perennial plant. This aromatic herb can be used for cooking, medicine, and aromatic purposes and stands up very well to our robust fall and winter vegetables. The leaves are excellent fresh added to your dishes near the end of cooking to preserve the delicate flavor. Also, you could easily dry your thyme for later use by spreading the sprigs out in a warm dry location for a few days, then stripping the dry leaves off into a storage container.

 Shallot: large shares received 2 shallots. Shallots are another member of the onion family, and are used similarly to onions and garlic, but are generally milder and sweeter in nature. Shallots also incorporate themselves into dishes more fully than onions and leave a greater depth of flavor. Shallots are prized in many cuisines around the world and are excellent caramelized, fried crisp as a topping, pickled, and cooked with meats.

I hope you enjoy this week’s box and thank you all for joining us!

Asha, Joe and the crew at Wobbly Cart

 

 Fall Potato Salad: Toss 2 lbs cubed potatoes with salt and olive oil and spread on a baking sheet. Roast in a 450 degree oven for 20 to 30 minutes. Combine with various fall vegetables of your choice; onion, shallot, garlic, carrots, roasted winter squash,celariac or parsnips for example. Toss with fresh tomato wedges, basil, thyme or other herbs of your choice. Dress with ¼ cup olive oil whipped with 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar.

Leek and Potato Gratin: Preheat oven to 375. In a large pot of salted boiling water, parboil 3 lbs red potatoes, sliced 1/8 inch thick, for 5 minutes. Drain potatoes well and set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp unsalted butter over medium heat. Saute 10 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1 inch pieces (washed thoroughly), and 4 chopped garlic cloves until leeks are tender about 7 minutes. Set aside. In a buttered 9 x 13 inch baking dish, arrange half of reserved potatoes in an overlapping pattern. Pour 1 cup cream and ½ cup milk over the top and sprinkle with 1 tsp salt. Top with reserved leeks and arrange remaining potatoes. Pour another cup of heavy cream and ½ cup milk and sprinkle with ½ tsp salt. Bake until potatoes are tender, top of gratin is golden brown, and most of the cream and milk have been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Garnish with parsely. Serves 12. From November 2011 issue of Country Living magazine).

Celariac and Apple Slaw: Trim, peel, and cut into 1 inch matchsticks, 1 12oz Celery root. Cut 1 large Johnagold apple into matchsticks (2 cups). Combine together with 1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp fresh cider, 2 tsp sugar, 2 tsp dijon mustard, and 2 tsp chopped fresh parsley. Let stand for 30 minutes before serving.

Celeriac Mash: Peel and dice 3 ½ cups of celeriac. Cook celeriac in a large saucepan of boiling slated water for 15 minutes. Add 1 12 oz potato that has been peeled, and cut into 1 ½ inch chunks, and boil until celeriac and potato are very tender, about 15 minutes longer. Drain. Return to same saucepan; stir over medium-high heat until any excess liquid in pan evaporates, about 2 minutes. Add ¼ cup heavy cream and 2 Tbsp butter; mash until mixture is almost smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

 Frizzled Leeks: Cut 2 leeks (white and very light green parts only) into 2 inch lengths and then cut lengthwise into very fine shreds. Rinse the shreds thoroughly, using your fingers to separate the pieces and remove any grit hiding there. Drain thoroughly and blot dry with a clean towel. While the leeks dry, heat 2 to 4 cups canola oil in a deep pan. The pan should hold about 1 ½ inches deep of the oil. When the oil surface is shivering, add a few leek shreds and fry for 10 to 15 seconds. Remove the leeks to a paper towel lined platter to drain and cool. The oil should be hot enough to crisp the leeks golden brown in about 10 to 15 seconds, adjust temperature as needed. Fry the leeks in small batches until all are golden and crisp. Lightly season them with salt and use for snacking or to top salads and creamy soups. They will keep in an airtight container for 3 days at room temp.

 Baked acorn squash with brown sugar and butter: Preheat oven to 400. Cut 1 acorn squash in half and scoop out seeds and stringy pulp. Mix together 2 tbsp brown sugar, 2 tbsp softened butter, 2 tbsp maple syrup, and salt and pepper to taste. Rub the inside of the squash with this mixture. Place the squash cut side up on a baking sheet and bake the squash for about 1 hour or until tender when pierced with a fork.

 

 

Wobbly Cart Farm CSA box # 5

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7-15-14

 

Wobbly Cart Farm CSA box #5

 

Large share: fresh garlic, pearl onions, ½ lb green beans, green cabbage, romaine lettuce, summer squash, 1 ½ lb yellow finn new potatoes, beets, cucumber, kohlrabi, fresh thyme

 

Small share: fresh garlic, pearl onions, ½ lb green beans, romaine lettuce, summer squash, 1 lb yellow finn new potatoes, chard, rosemary

 

Dear CSA members,

 

I’m so glad the weather has cooled back down! It has been hot hot hot and tough to work in the fields and greenhouses. We were hitting mid-nineties by 5 pm here, and in the greenhouse that means well over 100. Keeping up with watering the transplants and irrigating the fields can become an all –consuming task during weather like that! And keeping oneself hydrated is just the same. I am very happy we live on the Chehalis River and can head down for a swim after a long hot day.

 

This week we have yellow finn new potatoes for you to enjoy. They are very delicate and the skins are tender and peel off easily. Their flavor is exceptional, tender and sweet. It is best to eat them up as soon as possible, but if you need to store them the refrigerator is the best place. In contrast, potatoes that are more mature and “cured” are best stored in a cool, dry and dark place, but not the refrigerator. Last week the variety “red norland’ was a bit of a disappointment, and I was glad to see the yellow finn’s were better quality. They aren’t perfect, as organically grown potatoes on our soil rarely are, but they are very delicious nonetheless.

There is tons of romaine in the field right now, so both share sizes will get a head. It’s so crunchy and scrumptious. To me romaine is a quintessential summer lettuce. It stands up to the heat and is very versatile; great as a ceazar salad, on a sandwich, or even grilled and then dressed with vinaigrette made with fresh thyme.

We also have pearl onions coming on. These are little tear-drop shaped onions that can be boiled whole, caramelized, or used as you would any regular onion. A nice change from scallions until the big onions such as Walla Walla sweet come on. We’ll probably have them next week, as well as cherry tomatoes, and I’m hoping fresh basil. Yay summer!

Things are going to ramp up for us from here on out, as harvests come quicker and heavier, until the first frosts of fall. We’ve got a packed schedule of CSA, markets, restaurant and co-op orders, harvesting, watering and weeding just to name a few of the things we must manage as a small, diverse organic farm. We’ll do what we can to keep up and in the meantime, thank you for your support!

Until next week,

 

Asha, Joe and the crew at Wobbly Cart

 

Mediterranean Tuna Salad with Olive Dressing: Place 1 lb tiny new potatoes (halved or quartered if large) in a 4 qt dutch oven; add water to cover. Bring to boiling, reduce heat. Cover and simmer 5 minutes. Add 1 lb thin green beans, stem ends trimmed. Cover, simmer 5 minutes or more or until potatoes and beans are just tender. Drain well. Meanwhile for Olive dressing; place ½ cup pimento stuffed green olives, 3 tbsp olive oil, 1 tbsp spicy brown mustard, 1 tbsp lemon juice, 1 tsp sugar, and ½ tsp pepper in a blender. Blend until smooth. Drizzle dressing over potatoes, green beans, and 1 12oz can solid white Albacore tuna, drained and broken into large chunks. Sprinkle with a bit of fresh thyme, and additional olives. Serve with lemon wedges.

 

Refrigerator Dilly Beans: place 2 pint sized canning jars and their lids in a pot of boiling water and heat for 1 minute. Lift out, drain and place on the counter. Divide 1 bunch fresh dill, 2 garlic cloves, peeled, 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds, 1 tsp dill seeds, ¼ tsp cayenne pepper, and 1 lb green beans, ends trimmed between the 2 jars, packing beans in lengthwise. In a small saucepan, combine 1 1/3 cup cider vinegar, 1 1/3 cup water, 2 tbsp kosher salt, and 1 tbsp sugar and bring to a boil over high heat, stirring until salt and sugar dissolve. Pour boiling liquid over the green beans and seal. Cool on a wire rack and refrigerate for 2 days before serving.

 

Braised pearl onions: remove tops from pearl onion bunch and drop into boiling water for 1 minute. Remove and cool slightly, then trim off ends and slip off skins.

Heat 2 tbsp butter in a large heavy saucepan and sautee the onions in one layer until slightly browned. Then add chicken or vegetable stock , until it comes halfway up the onions in the pan, add salt to taste and 1 tsp sugar. Cover and simmer slowly for 25 minutes, or until tender. Uncover and boil off excess liquid, add 1 more tbsp butter if desired.

 

Late Summer Vegetables with Aioli: Preheat oven to 450. Blanch ½ lb green beans in a large pot of salted boiling water until just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain, plunge into a bowl of ice and water, then drain again and pat dry on a kitchen towel. Toss 1 lb of new potatoes, halved lengthwise, and 3 small summer squash, sliced diagonally, separately with 2 tbsp olive oil each, some sea salt, and about 5 or 6 sprigs of fresh thyme. Roast separately in a single layer on rimmed baking sheets until just tender, 7 to 10 minutes for zucchini and 20 to 25 for potatoes. Make aioli: in a bowl whisk egg with a pinch of fine sea salt and 2 tsp champagne vinegar or fresh lemon juice until thick. Whisk in 1 cup of extra virgin olive oil gradually, drop by drop for the first ¼ cup or so (until the mixture is emulsified) and then in a thin stream until aioli is nice and thick; you may not need all the oil. Sprinkle 2 to 4 garlic cloves with ½ tsp fine sea salt. Mince with a chef’s knife, then use the side of the blade to crush garlic into a paste. Stir garlic paste into the mayonnaise. Taste and add more salt or vinegar if you like. Arrange cooked vegetables as well as lettuce leaves, thin wedges of fennel, and halved cherry tomatoes on a large platter or ling board, top with more fresh thyme sprigs, and serve with aioli. (from August 2013 issue of Sunset Magzine).

Thai Cucumber Salad: in a strainer, allow 3 thinly sliced cucumbers and 1 tsp Celtic sea salt to sit for 1 hour while water drains. Combine ½ cup finely chopped onion, ½ cup sesame oil, 2 Tbsp lime juice, 2 T fresh basil, finely chopped, and ½ tbsp fresh ginger, minced with the cucumbers in a mixing bowl and mix well.

 

 

Wobbly Cart Farm Fall CSA box #4

Large Fall Share #4

Large Fall Share #4

Wobbly Cart Farm Fall CSA box #4

11-12-13

Large Shares: Beets, Carrots, Parsley Root, Leeks, Potatoes, Delicata Squash, Chard, Rapini, Celariac, Thyme, Rosemary, Garlic

Small Shares: Leeks, Potatoes, Delicata Squash, Rapini, Beets, Carrots, Thyme, Rosemary, Garlic

Dear CSA members,

Here we are at the last week of our Fall season. Again, the weeks seem to have flown by and it’s hard to believe it is almost Thanksgiving! On the farm we have been enjoying the relatively mild weather, and the slower pace of the late season. It has been such a pleasant fall season. Seems like in years past there has been much more freezing weather, sideways rain and near floods! Thankfully, not this year.
Many of the end of season tasks around the farm are virtually done. The cover crops are growing, manure has been spread on some of our fallow fields, most of the onions and squash have been sold or sorted, and all the irrigation equipment has been put away till next year. The only exception seems to be our two high tunnels, which still await me to break down what’s left of the summer tomatoes and peppers, roll up the drip irrigation tape, compost and cover crop. It seems to be a dilemma of the season extension, timing the crops so there is actually a break to amend the soil and cover crop. Hopefully, I will get that done this week or next!
New this week we have Rapini, Delicata Squash and Parsley Root. Rapini is essentially the Italian equivalent to turnip greens. I read this article last night and thought is was quite a fitting summary as well as a nice recipe. Rapini will keep, wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator for about a week.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/zester-daily/rapini_b_4072299.html

Parsley root is another vegetable better known in Europe than the United States. This long white root is a member of the carrot family, and looks like a parsnip, but tastes more like celery or parsley. The roots have a strong flavor that lends itself well to caramelizing or adding flavor to soups and stews. Stored like carrots these roots will keep for several weeks.
Delicata is the queen of the winter squash in my opinion. They are a nice size, easy to cut and clean, have a thin, edible skin and excellent flavor. Delicata is excellent roasted, caramelized, made into soups or baked into a pie! Most people think they are even sweeter and creamier than butternut squash. This squash will also keep for a long time in a cool dry place, like a pantry shelf.
I want to be sure to say thank you to everyone for joining us this season. It has been a wonderful 22 weeks growing food for you. I thought I should also be sure to tell you that we have lots of great produce for sale at the Olympia Farmer’s Market Saturday and Sundays. We have a $22 to $23“Market Special” box each week that is very similar to picking your weekly CSA box. Ask about a discount for our CSA members!
We hope you have enjoyed the season as much as we have! Please remember to take care of any balance due on your account, as well as return all plastic CSA boxes to the drop sites! We will be back to pick them up next week!

Have a happy and healthy holiday season and we’ll see you next year!

Asha, Joe and the Crew at Wobbly Cart

Creamy Barley and Chard Dressing: Preheat oven to 325. Cook 1 ¼ cups pearled barley in 4 cups chicken broth according to package directions and add ¾ tsp cracked black pepper. Meanwhile in a large skillet cook 2 cups chopped onion, and 1 ½ lbs winter squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1 inch pieces in ½ cup butter over medium heat, covered, until just tender, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in cooked barley, 5 cups chopped Swiss chard, 1 cup toasted, chopped walnuts, and 1 ½ cups finely shredded Parmesan cheese. Transfer to a 3- quart rectangular baking dish. Bake, uncovered, 25 to 30 minutes or until heated through. Makes 8 servings. (From BHG magazine November 2013)

Lemon Garlic Mashed Potatoes: in a large saucepan cook 3 lbs potatoes, scrubbed and cut into chunks and 4 cloves of garlic halved in lightly salted boiling water, covered, 20 to 25 minutes or until tender. Drain potatoes, reserving 1 cup water. Mash potatoes with a potato masher until smooth. Add 2 tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp butter, ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper and enough of the reserved liquid to reach the desired consistency. Stir to combine. Transfer potatoes to serving dish. Top with 2 tbsp capers, drained, 1/3 cup chopped Italian parsley, 2 tsp finely shredded lemon peel. Drizzle with 1 tbsp olive oil and squeeze the juice of 1 lemon over before serving.

Delicata Squash Rings: Preheat oven to 375. Take a whole delicata squash and slice it across sideways. This will make ring shapes out of it. Scoop the seeds out of the middles of your squash rings. Lightly oil a large cast iron skillet with olive oil. Lay the rings out in a single layer across the skillet. Place in the hot oven. Bake for about 10 minutes. Then flip the rings with a spatula. Bake the other side until both sides are lightly browned and the squash is tender. Remove from oven and serve.

Leek and Potato Gratin: Preheat oven to 375. In a large pot of salted boiling water, parboil 3 lbs red potatoes, sliced 1/8 inch thick, for 5 minutes. Drain potatoes well and set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp unsalted butter over medium heat. Saute 10 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1 inch pieces (washed thoroughly), and 4 chopped garlic cloves until leeks are tender about 7 minutes. Set aside. In a buttered 9 x 13 inch baking dish, arrange half of reserved potatoes in an overlapping pattern. Pour 1 cup cream and ½ cup milk over the top and sprinkle with 1 tsp salt. Top with reserved leeks and arrange remaining potatoes. Pour another cup of heavy cream and ½ cup milk and sprinkle with ½ tsp salt. Bake until potatoes are tender, top of gratin is golden brown, and most of the cream and milk have been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Garnish with parsely. Serves 12. From November 2011 issue of Country Living magazine).

Celariac and Apple Slaw: Trim, peel, and cut into 1 inch matchsticks, 1 12oz Celery root. Cut 1 large Johnagold apple into matchsticks (2 cups). Combine together with 1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp fresh cider, 2 tsp sugar, 2 tsp dijon mustard, and 2 tsp chopped fresh parsley. Let stand for 30 minutes before serving.

Pumpkin, Parsley Root, and Thyme Soup: Clean and peel 1 small Pie Pumpkin or Delicata Squash, cut into cubes. Combine the squash with 1.5 L chicken stock, 1 chopped onion, 5 cubed parsley roots (or Celaria), 1 cubed potato, ½ tsp salt, 1 clove minced garlic, 2 sprigs fresh thyme, stems removed, and bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer without the lid on and cook for 30 minutes. Puree the soup and add ½ tsp chili flakes. Simmer for 20 minutes more. Garnish with ½ tsp more chili flakes, more fresh thyme and black pepper. Serve with homemade croutons. (honestcooking.com)

Wobbly Cart Farm CSA box #17

2013fallcsaflyer2 Wobbly Cart Farm CSA box #17

Large Shares: Spinach, Delicata Squash, Leeks, Potatoes, Red Onions, Butterhead Lettuce, Carrots, Sweet Peppers, Celariac, Parsnips, Fresh Thyme, Garlic

Small Shares: Eggplant, Delicata Squash, Leeks, Red Onion, Lettuce, Carrots, Cabbage, Fresh Thyme, Garlic

Dear CSA members,

Seems like almost overnight the leaves have turned color and are blowing down in the fall wind. What happened to summer? The week’s have flown by and now we are reaching the end of our season. It has been an amazing journey and such a pleasure growing and packing these vegetables for you. Hope you have enjoyed the journey as well! We still have tons of produce in the fields and barns to carry us through the next several months, as this week’s box will reflect. We have many of our best fall staples this week. A fresh bunch of spinach for the large shares, as well as, our first taste of leeks, Delicata squash, thyme, celariac and parsnips. Delicata squash is a delicious winter squash variety. This long yellow and green striped squash will keep for several weeks on your counter top or in the pantry, and in fact will develop more flavor in time. To eat cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and bake face down in a buttered glass baking pan at 350 degrees until tender. Scoop out the sweet and tender flesh and enjoy. There are many ways to use winter squash including baking them into pies. If you don’t want to eat it now, it will keep for several weeks, so no hurry. The large and unusual knobby root with celery-like tops is celeriac. When the root is scrubbed and peeled, inside is a firm ivory flesh. The celeriac roots is very low in starch and is a nice alternative to potatoes and other starchier root vegetables. It tastes like a subtle blend of celery and parsley. You can use it in soups, grated into salads, roasted in a pan of other root vegetables, or even French fried instead of potatoes. Large shares will also get 1 lb of parsnips. These are the gorgeous white carrot-like roots. Indeed, they are related to the carrot and have been eaten as a vegetable since antiquity. The parsnip develops an incredibly sweet and rich flavor once we have had several weeks of cold weather, a phenomenon that has occurred early this year! You can enjoy parsnips peeled, then roasted, fried, boiled and mashed and even raw. Both parsnips and celeriac will keep a very long time if wrapped and refrigerated. Thyme is an herb from a low growing woody perennial plant. This aromatic herb can be used for cooking, medicine, and aromatic purposes and stands up very well to our robust fall and winter vegetables. The leaves are excellent fresh added to your dishes near the end of cooking to preserve the delicate flavor. Also, you could easily dry your thyme for later use by spreading the sprigs out in a warm dry location for a few days, then stipping the dry leaves off into a storage container. And last but not least, another star of the fall and winter: leeks! These tall alliums look like giant scallions and are and excellent addition to your fall and winter menu. Slice the leek lengthwise and rinse out any sediment before chopping. The white part is the most desirable and adds a sweet subtle onion flavor to your dishes. Leeks are superb in soups, braised, or sliced very thin and crisp-fried and a garnish. Hope you enjoy! And please remember to return your CSA boxes to the drop site and well as clear up any remaining balance on your account before the season is over. Thank you! Asha, Joe and the Crew at Wobbly Cart

Fall Potato Salad: Toss 2 lbs cubed potatoes with salt and olive oil and spread on a baking sheet. Roast in a 450 degree oven for 20 to 30 minutes. Combine with various fall vegetables of your choice; onion, garlic, carrots, roasted winter squash,celariac or parsnips for example. Toss with fresh tomato wedges, basil, thyme or other herbs of your choice. Dress with ¼ cup olive oil whipped with 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar.

Roasted Carrots with Parsnips and Thyme: Preheat oven to 350. Peel and trim 1 lb each of carrots and parsnips and cut them inhalf lengthwise. Large ones can be quartered. Place them on a large rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle the carrots and parsnips with 3 tbsp olive oil and 2 tbsp honey. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Scatter 6 sprigs of fresh thyme on top. After 10 minutes, give the veggies a toss and put back in the oven for another 10 minutes until soft and slightly caramelized. Serve warm.

Celeriac Mash: Peel and dice 3 ½ cups of celeriac. Cook celeriac in a large saucepan of boiling slated water for 15 minutes. Add 1 12 oz potato that has been peeled, and cut into 1 ½ inch chunks, and boil until celeriac and potato are very tender, about 15 minutes longer. Drain. Return to same saucepan; stir over medium-high heat until any excess liquid in pan evaporates, about 2 minutes. Add ¼ cup heavy cream and 2 Tbsp butter; mash until mixture is almost smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Leek and Potato Gratin: Preheat oven to 375. In a large pot of salted boiling water, parboil 3 lbs potatoes, sliced 1/8 inch thick, for 5 minutes. Drain potatoes well and set aside. In a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp unsalted butter over medium heat. Saute 10 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1 inch pieces (washed thoroughly), and 4 chopped garlic cloves until leeks are tender about 7 minutes. Set aside. In a buttered 9 x 13 inch baking dish, arrange half of reserved potatoes in an overlapping pattern. Pour 1 cup cream and ½ cup milk over the top and sprinkle with 1 tsp salt. Top with reserved leeks and arrange remaining potatoes. Pour another cup of heavy cream and ½ cup milk and sprinkle with ½ tsp salt. Bake until potatoes are tender, top of gratin is golden brown, and most of the cream and milk have been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Garnish with parsely. Serves 12. From November 2011 issue of Country Living magazine).

Delicata Squash with Thyme and Cider Glaze: Peel 2 medium Delicata squash with a vegetable peeler, cut it in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece in half lengthwise again, then crosswise into ½ inch thick slices. Melt 3 Tbsp unsalted butter in a large skillet over low heat. Add and 1 Tbsp coarsely chopped thyme and cook, stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture. Add the squash to the skillet, then 1 ½ cups unfiltered apple cider or juice, 1 cup water, 2 tsp sherry vinegar, 1 tsp salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper and additional salt if needed. ( from The Herbfarm Cookbook by Jerry Traunfeld).

Delicata Squash Rings: Preheat oven to 375. Take a whole delicata squash and slice it across sideways. This will make ring shapes out of it. Scoop the seeds out of the middles of your squash rings. Lightly oil a large cast iron skillet with olive oil. Lay the rings out in a single layer across the skillet. Place in the hot oven. Bake for about 10 minutes. Then flip the rings with a spatula. Bake the other side until both sides are lightly browned and the squash is tender. Remove from oven and serve.

Frizzled Leeks: Cut 2 leeks (white and very light green parts only) into 2 inch lengths and then cut lengthwise into very fine shreds. Rinse the shreds thoroughly, using your fingers to separate the pieces and remove any grit hiding there. Drain thoroughly and blot dry with a clean towel. While the leeks dry, heat 2 to 4 cups canola oil in a deep pan. The pan should hold about 1 ½ inches deep of the oil. When the oil surface is shivering, add a few leek shreds and fry for 10 to 15 seconds. Remove the leeks to a paper towel lined platter to drain and cool. The oil should be hot enough to crisp the leeks golden brown in about 10 to 15 seconds, adjust temperature as needed. Fry the leeks in small batches until all are golden and crisp. Lightly season them with salt and use for snacking or to top salads and creamy soups. They will keep in an airtight container for 3 days at room temp.