Wobbly Cart Farm CSA week 21

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11-14-17

 

Wobbly Cart Farm CSA week 21

 

Large shares: Lower Salmon River winter squash, leeks, carrots, beets, purple potatoes, red Russian kale, vitamin green, sweet peppers

 

Small shares: Lower Salmon River or orange kabocha winter squash, leeks, carrots, beets, fingerling potatoes, red Russian kale, vitamin green, sweet peppers

 

Greens share: arugula, mustard greens, raddichio Varigata di Chioggia

 

Roots share: celeriac, red potatoes, parsley root

 

Juicing share: beets seconds, carrot seconds, chard, cilantro, green cabbage

 

Storage share: 10lb yellow Finn potato, 10lb delicata squash, 10 lb mixed winter squash, 3 lb red cipollini onions, garlic, 5lbs mixed root vegetables (beets, daikon, parsnips), 10lb carrots

 

 

Dear CSA members,

 

A windy and blustery start to our week on the farm! Yesterday we had a pretty tough day out harvesting in the 40 mph gusts and periodic heavy rain. Around the barn boxes and other loose things were definitely blowing around. There is a part of the barn called the “breezeway” where we pack CSA boxes that basically becomes an intense wind-tunnel. We stayed out of there and we were quite surprised that we didn’t loose power! In our case, no power means no running water and that makes washing crops and seeing in the barn after dark pretty difficult.

 

We got though yesterday and were happy to pack shares for you this morning! It was less rainy and windy so that was nice. This week I am sending out the storage shares for winter and next week will be our final box for the season! Be sure to round up any CSA totes you may still have for returns and check that your balance is paid.

 

 

Storage shares: We made some slight variations to the original storage share that is listed when you ordered these. Due to our lack of garlic this year and smaller onion crop we had to change around the quantities a bit and added some mixed root vegetables. Potatoes should be stored cool and dry and in the dark. Winter squash and onions should be kept at room temperature and dry. Carrots and other roots must be refrigerated. You should check through your stores periodically and remove /prioritize anything that might be failing in quality, this will prevent any rot from spreading.

 

Lower Salmon River winter squash: This Pacific Northwest heirloom squash variety was discovered in the Lower Salmon River area of Idaho, where it has been grown for generations. The pretty salmon pink skin with slight mottling can be quite thick and hard, a characteristic that makes it an excellent keeper. Under ideal conditions it has been known to store for up to one year! The Culinary Breeding Network calls Lower Salmon River a big flavor winner: “The texture was on point in each cooking method [raw, steamed, roasted]….will perform well in a variety of processes including a quick and mild pickle, sweet and sour, simple preparations such as roasted, skin on slices or cubed and cooked with hearty herbs and spices. Great squash for home and restaurant alike.”

 

Orange kabocha squash: These squat orange winter squash are popular in Asia and are also known as Japanese pumpkin. The flesh is an intense yellow-orange color with a sweet velvety and slightly dry texture. Great for making sauces, soups, sauteeing, and baking with. Before eating make sure the stem is very corky and dry which shows maturity. The squash itself will keep for many weeks if kept in a cool, dry location.

 

Raddichio Varigata di Chioggia: This raddichio variety that comes from the Chioggia region of Italy. It is an excellent winter keeper in our fields and has a nice variegated pink, red and green color pattern. It has a bitter taste that mellows with the onset of cold weather and also when you grill or roast it. Raddichio is an excellent addition to salads particularly when paired with cheese, fruits and toasted nuts. I liked this article from the New York Times  http://www.nytimes.com/1988/12/21/garden/radicchio-tasty-but-so-misunderstood.html?pagewanted=all

 

Vitamin Green: White stalks and very glossy green leaves. Mild-flavored for salad, steamed, or stir-fry. Easy to grow, unfazed by heat, very cold-hardy. Good choice for winter and early spring salads. Eat stalks, leaves, and flowers!

 

Have a great week,

 

Asha

 

 

 

Roasted Kabocha squash with pancetta and sage: Preheat oven to 400 degress. Halve and seed 1 4 lb kabocha squash. Roast squash cut side down, in an oiled roasting pan in the middle of the oven until tender, about 1 hour. When cool enough to handle scrape flesh from the skin. heat 1 cup vegetable oil in a small deep sauce pan until it registers 365 on a deep -fat thermometer. Fry 20 whole fresh sage leaves in 3 batches until crisp, 3 to 5 seconds. transfer leaves with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. Cool 1/4 lb sliced pancetta that has been coarsely chopped in a heavy 4 quart pot over moderate heat, stirring until browned. Transfer pancetta with slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. Add 1 tbsp olive oil to pancetta fat remaining in pot, then cook 1 large chopped onion, until softened. Stir in 2 minced cloves of garlic and 1 1/2 tbsp of chopped fresh sage and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add squash, 1 1/2 cups chicken broth, 3 1/2 cups water and simmer 20 minutes to blend flavors. Stir in 1 tbsp red wine vinegar and salt and pepper to taste. Serve sprinkled wiht pancetta and fried sage leaves.

 

Potato-Leek Vinaigrette: Wash 4 leeks well. Slice the bulb and tender green parts into ½ inch pieces. Drop the sliced leeks into boiling water, cook them for about minutes, drain, set aside to cool. Cut 4 medium potatoes into 1 ½ inch chunks. Drop them into boiling, salted water and cook them until tender, but firm, about 10 minutes. Drain, set aside. Slice 1 or 2 sweet pepper into 1 inch strips. Whisk together ¼ cup vinegar, 1 minced garlic clove, 1 ½ tsp chopped fresh dill, and salt and pepper to taste. Then combine the leeks, potatoes and peppers in a serving bowl, Pour the vinaigrette over and chill well before serving.

 

Garlicky Vitamin g\Green: heat 2 tsp olive oil in a large cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add 2 minced garlic cloves and cook until fragrant about 30 seconds. Add 1/3 cup finely chopped mildly spicy red peppers and cook until they begin to soften. Add about 4 or 5 cups chopped vitamin green and cook until wilted and bright green and the stems pierce easily with a fork, 3 to 5 minutes. Season with a bit of tamari.

 

Winter Squash Tacos with Spicy Black Beans: Preheat broiler. Place 2 jalapenos and 1 serrano chile in a broiler pan and broil, turning a few times, until charred and blistered in spots, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove and set aside. Change oven setting to bake at 400 degrees F. In a large bowl toss 5 cups diced Lower Salmon River Winter squash or other variety ( peel and seed first then dice to ½ inch cubes) with ½ cup diced onion, 2 tbsp olive oil, 1 ½ tsp ground cumin, 1 ½ tsp ground coriander, 2 tsp ancho chile powder, and 1 tsp salt. Stir to coat. Divide the mixture between 2 rimmed baking sheets, spreading the squash thinly and leaving some space between pieces. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the squash and onion edges begin to caramelize. Rotate the pans and stir halfway through. Meanwhile, peel, stem and seed the peppers and finely chop. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat. Add 2 minced cloves of garlic and cook for 1 minute; add 1 15 ounce can fire-roasted diced tomatoes. Allow to bubbly briskly for 5 to 10 minutes. Sprinkle on 3 tsp ancho chile powder and add the roasted peppers and 2 15 ounce cans of black beans, one of the cans drained. Cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring carefully to keep the beans whole. When they reach your preferred consistency, remove from heat, stir in ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro and adjust seasonings as needed. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium high. Warm 12 small corn tortillas one by one, about 10 seconds per side. Assemble tacos by placing a few tbsp of beans on each tortilla, place on that a mound of roasted squash and onions, them sprinkle with Cotija cheese, cilantro and a squeeze of lime juice.

 

Oven Roasted Beets with Winter Citrus Vinaigrette: preheat oven to 400. Wrap 3 large beets individually in foil. Place them on a baking sheet and roast unitl fork tender about 40 to 60 minutes. Carefully open packets and allow to cool. Then remove skins and discard. Chop the beets inot ½ inch chunks. Combine ¼ cup freshly squeezed blood orange juice, ¼ cup freshly squeezed grapefruit juice, and 2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat , and simmer gently until reduced to ¼ cup. Remove from heat and whisk in 1 tbsp honey, 1 tbsp white wine vinegar. Add in 6 tbsp olive oil in a slow steady stream whisking until emulsified. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Toss the beets with 1 tsp blood orange zest, and ½ tsp lemon zest and ¼ cup of the vinaigrette; marinate for at least 20 minutes. Garnish with 1 tsp fresh chopped thyme.

 

 

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